Blog

Reflections upon metacognition and the role of teacher beliefs

By , 10th September 2018

Every year over the summer break I aim to read at least one educational book a month and in 2009 it was the turn of Guy Claxton’s ‘What’s the point of school?’. On page 113 he pays great tribute to his A level Chemistry teacher, Michael Shayer, the leading academic on the Cognitive Acceleration project. […]

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Let’s Think in Finland

By , 3rd July 2018

As a Let’s Think tutor I visited Finland in spring at the invitation of teacher educators at Turku University. They are very interested in the Let’s Think approach and I was interested in what sets Finland apart as a high performing education system with a narrow range of attainment. There are of course many differences […]

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Writing less and thinking more!

By , 5th March 2018

It would seem from pupils’ responses from Let’s Think in English lessons that sometimes they are often provided with definitions of literary terms e.g. genre, sonnet etc but are infrequently provided with an opportunity to apply the definition to a text and see if it fits. Pupils need an opportunity to make meaning from the […]

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Fear of the unknown: how the need to cover content negatively affects learning

By , 26th January 2018

In November, I was lucky enough to pay a second visit to Japan to observe teaching and learning.  And I was reminded of the strengths of the Japanese approach to learning. I observed a science lesson with Year 4 about wind power.  In the previous lesson, children had planned an experiment to test wind power, […]

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‘Picking-and-Choosing’ for teaching innovation

By , 14th December 2017

I became aware lately that my understanding of cognitive development has become the lens by which I frame everything in which I engage. Not only in schools or with relatives, but with any human interaction: this could be quite boring to people if I am not careful! Perhaps that is a natural affliction for any […]

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Raising attainment and reducing teacher workload

By , 10th November 2017

Since 2008 the Government has accepted two important truths about education in England’s schools, but has decided to inform schools about only one of them. The first is that attainment in our schools hasn’t risen since the 1990s. This is shown by all three of the main international education surveys: PISA, PIRLS and TIMSS. These […]

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Concrete preparation: fast or slow?

By , 10th October 2017

I’ve often felt in my work with teachers, that concrete preparation was the least well understood of the Let’s Think principles. Social construction has experienced a recent boom in popularity, aligning with work on dialogic teaching (Alexander, 2008) and supporting the move towards partner and group work in classrooms. Metacognition is now a buzz word […]

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Let’s Think at Ruislip High School

By , 4th September 2017

Dr. Martina Lecky is the Headteacher of Ruislip High School. Martina has had a long involvement with Let’s Think, one that resulted in a doctoral study supervised by Professor Philip Adey. In this post she shares her views on the ongoing value of Let’s Think to her as a school leader. Each year my school […]

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Agreeing with Ofsted!

By , 13th July 2017

When teaching full-time in secondary education I always wondered what it would be like to be part of a school where all staff shared a common view on how best to help their pupils reach their potential. Indeed, as a parent you see the potential in your own children from the moment of birth, and […]

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Could there be such a thing as Let’s Think Geography? How to use what we know about Let’s Think in ‘another’ subject.

By , 15th June 2017

Let’s Think is rooted in a subject. The subject provides the context within which pupils face challenges to their powers of reasoning. The challenges also arise from the essential requirements for a pupil’s deep understanding of the subject. Thus in Let’s Think Secondary Science we have a lesson, ‘The P Word’ which is set in […]

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