Our History

 

Let’s Think began life as a science research project called CASE (Cognitive Acceleration through Science Education) at King’s College London, led by Philip Adey, Michael Shayer and Carolyn Yates in the 1980s.  This project built on the work of Feuerstein who believed that any pupil can make progress if taught in the right way. The CASE project for KS3 pupils was shown to have an impact not just on pupils’ attainment in science, but also in English and maths.  It was then developed for maths as CAME (Cognitive Acceleration through Maths Education).   Currently under development at King’s College is the newest of the Cognitive Acceleration programmes: Let’s Think in English 

Numerous research papers published over a thirty-year period have shown the effects of teaching Let’s Think on pupils’ learning are:

  • permanent, i.e. do not fade with time
  • across subjects. i.e. not confined to the school subject they started with
  • statistically significant compared with similar classes without Let’s Think lessons
  • applicable to 6/7 year olds as well as 11/12 year olds
  • proven to have a significant effect on pupils’ capabilities with even a moderate use
  • replicable elsewhere, eg in Finland

Few, if any other approach has produced such long-term effects across the board.

Ofsted have identified Let’s Think as an effective approach to maths teaching.